Why can’t I order oat milk on the Starbucks app? (Why doesn’t Starbucks have oat milk?)

Starbucks oat milk beverages are amazing, and I love their creamy texture and their plant-based source. I’m sure many people do as well, particularly due to their versatility with Starbucks espressos. There is a problem though – oat milk is notoriously absent from the smartphone app, and I noticed that I could only order it in an indirect form as the oat milk honey latte. This led me to the question: Why is it difficult to order oat milk from the app?

Starbucks does not explicitly state the reason behind the lack of oat milk options on their Starbucks app, but the likely reasons are that the milk is only available in specific areas of the US (the eastern states), and there were problems with the oat milk supplier, Oatly. This resulted in supply issues, which made oat milk options unavailable in many outlets since the pandemic.

If you are like me and want to go completely vegan or are seeking to ditch dairy, oat milk is a great way to achieve that goal – and Starbucks offers that in a limited number of stores. The lack of the option on their smartphone app is disappointing, but you can choose to order in-person from certain Starbucks locations; particularly if you are in the Midwest or Eastern Coast of the US.

What makes Starbucks oat milk so good?

Oat is among the latest options Starbucks offered on their menus, with the company introducing them in 2018 to complement their 100% Arabica coffee drinks. You are likely to associate them with a creamy texture that is similar to actual dairy while remaining lactose-free, as they offer a slightly sweet and mild taste and have nutritional benefits as well.

When you are ordering the drink, always check the allergen menu to check if there are any allergens present, although most drinks (including the oat ones) do not contain any gluten ingredients.

The brand they use is Oatly, and it is a major advantage as they do not have much sugar, so if you are struggling to get their oat milk drinks you can always purchase oats from Oatly and use them to make your drinks.

Why does Starbucks use Oatly?

Why can’t I order oat milk on the Starbucks app?

Starbucks recently stated that they will improve their oat milk options and include choices such as oat milk honey latte, although this would only be available in select stores. Steamed oat milk, a drizzle of honey, a shot of Starbucks Blonde espresso, and a toasted honey topping comprise the recipe.

Oatly oats are great for substituting into any drink you want, and they are as versatile as the company’s almond, coconut, and soy milk options. Oatly products carry a distinct advantage compared to other oats – they have a gluten-free rating, which is very good for reducing cross-contamination and makes the drinks safe for consumption by anyone.

Some oat brands may contain gluten, so it is always best to look for those that have a gluten-free rating such as Oatly. Making oat milk at home is a valid option as well, as it is inexpensive to make and easy to mix into your homemade lattes or coffee drinks.

Alternatives to Starbucks oat milk options

If you are looking for alternatives you can take that are still tasty and nutritious, you do not need to go for the actual dairy. Understanding the best plant-based coffee drink can be tricky, but it is worth knowing that each plant-milk drink option has its advantages. Each option is therefore different, and these differences include:

  • Coconut milk – this is the ‘middle of the road’ option in terms of the plant-based milk options Starbucks offers. It has lower calories compared to oat milk, but it is the highest in its sugar and saturated fat counts.

Starbucks oat milk options

  • Almond milk – this is an excellent choice if you want to consume fewer calories compared to dairy or other plant-based kinds of milk.
  • Soya milk – similar to coconut milk, this is a nutritionally-dense plant milk choice that includes plenty of essential nutrients and proteins. However, soya milk also has a negative reputation to deal with, since studies also show its link to various long-term diseases.

Oat milk is great for people that want to live a healthier lifestyle in the overall sense, as it contains higher amounts of fiber. It works as an easy way to get more fiber in your diet without really ‘trying’.

How you can order oat milk drinks at Starbucks

I am a fan of the Grande-size drinks, so if this is your preference and you want to go for a Grande-size oat milk latte, you are getting 1g protein and 2g fiber. While this is a step up from lower cup quantities, it is not time to celebrate yet – the drink also includes 42g carbohydrates and 28g sugar.

To make the drink healthier, you should opt to remove the honey syrup and the honey topping, although the sugar-free result will force you to take some time to adapt to the oat taste. If you cannot bear with the taste and still want to keep your calorie count low, you can choose to go for the almond milk options instead, especially the flat white drink.

Conclusion

There are several reasons behind the unavailability of oat milk on the Starbucks app, but the main one is the shortage of raw materials due to supply issues. However, you can explore other alternatives as well as order the product in select Starbucks stores.

FAQs

Is Starbucks completely out of oat milk?

Not entirely, as you can still order oat milk drinks from a number of their stores – just not in the app. Several supply issues have contributed to the problem, and the company chose to remove it from the app entirely because of this.

Is the Starbucks oat milk option gluten-free?

Yes, it is, since oat milk is free of nuts, soy, lactose, dairy, and gluten. However, it is worth noting that there may be cross-contamination of your drink when the drink is from the same equipment that gluten-containing drinks come from.

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